Research

Looking through my publications, it is clear that I have been down a twisting, winding path as a writer and researcher. Earliest work focuses on off-farm labor issues and rural poverty.

 

Publications

Benchmarking of Leadership Development Practices at Leading Undergraduate Business Schools – 2006

To develop leadership capacity one needs individual awareness, knowledge of leadership theories and ideas, mastery of specific skills and abilities, experience in being a leader, factors to transform experiences into experiential learning and capstone acknowledgement. The gap is not so much the availability of opportunities, but the failure to package existing courses and opportunities into the meaningful leadership program and mandate a pathway though it.

Streeter, Deborah H., and Brendon Lehman ’06. Benchmarking of Leadership Development Practices at Leading Undergraduate Business Schools. Department of Applied Economics and Management: Cornell University. fetch

 

Entrepreneurship and the Modern University – 12-2004

The paper examines the trend towards university-wide programs in entrepreneurship education. We present a conceptual framework for dividing university-wide programs into two categories: “magnet programs”, which draw students into entrepreneurship courses offered in the business school, and “radiant programs,” which feature entrepreneurship courses outside the business school focused on specific context of the non-business students.

Streeter, Deborah H., and John P. Jaquette. “Entrepreneurship and the Modern University.” Empowering Rural Communities Through Entrepreneurship. Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, Alabama: Rural Community Economic Development: Experiences From the 1890 Land-Grant Institutions Proceedings, Dec. 2004. 57-89.

 

Futures and Options Trading: How to Cushion the – 2003

What I would like to talk to you about today is a way to lay at least an “area” rug to cushion against adverse price moved in the commodity markets. By laying a “rug” I mean using futures and options contracts to hedge against the uncertainties that will always characterize commodity marketing.

Streeter, Deborah H. Futures and Options Trading: How to Cushion the Fall. Department of Agricultural Economics, Cornell University.

 

Value-Added Ag-Based Economic Development: A Panacea or False Promise? (Part 1) – 02-2003

This paper is part one of a two-part companion series on Value-Added Ag-Based Economic Development. In this paper, we explore the confusion caused by the application of the term “value added” to a wide range of activities that may have very different characteristics. We also describe the difficulty of deciphering household income attributed to value-added activities and construct a framework for understanding the range and characteristics of economic activities of the farm household outside traditional commodity production. In the second paper, we outline what policymakers and others hope to achieve through value-added agricultural development and examine whether there is any theoretical or empirical basis for such expectations.

Streeter, Deborah H., and Nelson L. Bills. Value-Added Ag-Based Economic Development: A Panacea or False Promise? (Part 1). Working Paper 2003-07. Cornell University, Feb. 2003.

 

Value-Added Ag-Based Economic Development: A Panacea or False Promise? (Part 2) – 02-2003

This paper is the second in a two-part companion series on Value-Added Ag-Based Economic Development. In the first part of the series, we focused on the definition of value-added and the difficulty of deciphering household income attributed to value-added activities. In particular, we constructed a framework for understanding range and characteristics of economic activities of the farm household outside commodity production. In this paper, we outline what policymakers and others hope to achieve through value-added agricultural development and examine whether there is any theoretical or empirical basis for such expectations. Using the framework and definitions developed in the first paper, we examine a range of economic activities (both value-added and parallel deployment of resources) and argue that they are not all created equal when it comes to income enhancement, regional employment and land use.

Streeter, Deborah H., and Nelson L. Bills. Value-Added Ag-Based Economic Development: A Panacea or False Promise? (Part 2). Working Paper 2003-08. Cornell University, Feb. 2003.

 

University-wide Entrepreneurship Education: Alternative Models and Current Trends – 03-2002

The paper examines the trend towards university-wide programs in entrepreneurship education. We present a conceptual framework for dividing university-wide programs into two categories: “magnet programs,” which draw students into entrepreneurship courses offered in the business school, and “radiant programs,” which feature entrepreneurship courses outside the business school, focused on the specific context of the non-business students. Examining 38 ranked entrepreneurship programs, we found that about 75% now have university-wide programs, most of which follow a magnet model.

Streeter, Deborah H., John P. Jaquette, and Kathryn Hovis. University-wide Entrepreneurship Education: Alternative Models and Current Trends. Working Paper 2002-02. Cornell Univeristy, March 2002.

 

Community Collaboration Among Small Business Support Organizations: Attributes of Effectiveness – 05-2001

This is a study of factors that influence the effectiveness of collaboration among small business support organizations (SBSOs) in four upstate New York Counties, two of which are higher functioning collaborative groups and two which are lower functioning collaborative groups. The study was motivated by the experiences and observations of the leaders of the Entrepreneurship Education and Outreach (EEO) program at Cornell University over the past few years as they have worked to provide business training courses in upstate New York counties.

Schlough, Charles A., and Deborah Streeter. Community Collaboration Among Small Business Support Organizations: Attributes of Effectiveness. Research Bulletin 2001-03. Cornell University, May 2001.

 

Cornell University’s Entrepreneurship Education & Outreach Program: Evaluation and Proposal – 07-1999

This paper is an evaluation of the two year experience of Cornell University’s Entrepreneurship Education & Outreach (EEO) program and its efforts to disseminate and administer small business outreach training with the Premier FastTrac entrepreneurial curriculum. This paper describes EEO’s origin, purpose, and mission, and an evaluation of knowledge gained from the fourteen month experience with the FastTrac entrepreneurship training program ending January

Schlough, Charles, and Deborah H. Streeter. Cornell University’s Entrepreneurship Education & Outreach Program: Evaluation and Proposal. Working Paper 99-15. Cornell University, July 1999.

 

What it Takes – 03-1998

Deborah Streeter was interviewed by William Cockrum on her view and experience with entrepreneurship.

Cockrum, William. “What It Takes: Some people are natural entrepreneurs. Others shouldn’t even think about it. We asked the experts to explain.” Wall Street Journal 30 Mar. 1998.

 

Information Strategies for Agricultural Exporters – 1998

This study revealed some important divergences between new entrants and those more experienced at selling overseas. While experienced exporters have well-developed informal networks of information and focus their search strategies on better long term and short term supply/demand information, “would-be” exporters tend to be more concerned with locating a “qualified” buyers list, and getting information on export procedures, and trade logistics. In addition, would-be exporters expressed frustration with two types of obstacles where information is least likely to solve the problem: Time lags when shipping perishable goods and exogenous factors (such as precipitous changes in a foreign government).

Streeter, Deborah, and Nelson Bills. ” Information Strategies for Agricultural Exporters.” International Food and Agribusiness Management Review 1: 25-40. (1998).

 

Information Needs of Agricultural Exporters: Results from A Focus Group Series – 1997

Focus groups were held to provide more in-depth information on issues raised by a large-scale survey of agricultural exporters conducted in 1994 by USDA. Two focus groups were held in New York State and two in California, and the total of 28 participants included both experienced and new exporters of fruit products. The emphasis of the discussion was on the information-seeking behaviors of export firms and businesses that are considering entry in offshore markets, and on identifying potential information gaps or obstacles to success in the exporting arena.

Streeter, Deborah, Nelson Bills, Jane Maestro-Scherer, and Rob Neenan. Information Needs of Agricultural Exporters: Results from A Focus Group Series. A.E. Research 97-02. Cornell University, 1997.

 

An Object-Oriented Model for Simulating Milking Parlor Operations – 1994

A milking operation simulation model was developed using an object-oriented approach. Six object classes were defined: things, living things, animals, operator, cow, and parlor. Operator, cow, and parlor classes were the basic units of the model. Each object in the model is a self-contained unit that represents its real world counterpart. The model operation and events were scheduled by sending messages among the objects. Messages caused operator and cows to move between locations inside the parlor and caused changes in the model status. An algorithm for a discrete event simulation that was message-oriented was used to resolve possible conflicts among objects, thus empowering all objects in the model with decision-making capability. The method was designed as a teaching and research tool. Proper milking routine can be demonstrated with this model. Also, various milking situations can be created in the model to study effects that would be difficult to evaluate otherwise.

Chang, W., D. H. Streeter, and L. R. Jones. “An Object-Oriented Model for Simulating Milking Parlor Operations.” Journal of Dairy Science 77 (1994): 84-93.

 

Chaos Theory and Its Implications for Research on Futures Markets – 1993

A desire to discover the price generating function is a major goal of studies concerned with futures markets. Whether spurred by the urge to learn or the desire the quest. Over time, some have research the conclusion that price movements are the equivalent of random walk; others believe future price movements can be predicted by charting or other existing techniques.

Bernard, John C., and Deborah H. Streeter. Chaos Theory and Its Implications for Research on Futures Markets: A Review of Literature. Rep. Chicago, IL: NCR-134 Conference on Applied Commodity Price Analysis, Forecasting, and Market Risk Management, 1993.

 

The Impact of Teaching Methodology in Problem Solving – 1993

This research compares the effectiveness of the traditional sequential lecture and the use of instructor designed concept maps in undergraduate economic problem solving. The influence of the instructor’s presentation style on test scores was estimated in the context of other relevant variables hypothesized to affect student performance. Results of two-limit tobit censored regression model indicate that teaching methodology does not affect the student’s problem solving performance.

Willett, Lois Schertz, Harry M. Kaiser, Deborah Streeter, and Katherine L. Beissner. The Impact of Teaching Methodology in Problem Solving. Working Manuscript. Cornell University, 1993.

 

An Integrated Approach to Modeling Price Volatility in the Live Cattle Futures Market – 05-1992

An understanding of changes in price volatility is of value to policy makers and exchange committee members as well as other participants in commodity futures markets. Previous research has studied volatility by measuring: 1) the flow of new information into the market, or 2) the effect that the structure of the futures market has on price volatility. In this paper, a model is developed which integrates these two themes in the literature to measure and explain price volatility in live cattle futures prices. The model is subjected to a battery of diagnostic tests so that a comparison can be made between the integrated model and models from previous research. Also, since price volatility from the underlying commodity is a major component in the determination of option premiums, a comparison is made between the integrated model and a naive model to forecast live cattle option premiums.

Evans, Kevin J., Deborah H. Streeter, and Michael A. Hudson. An Integrated Approach to Modeling Price Volatility in the Live Cattle Futures Market. Staff Paper 92-4. Cornell University, May 1992.

 

Variability in Soybean Futures Prices: An Integrated Framework – 1992

This article is about the specification and evaluation of models designed to explain the volatility of prices for commodity futures contracts. Changes in the variance of futures prices are important to a variety of decision makers.

Streeter, Deborah H., and William G. Tomek. “Variability in Soybean Futures Prices: An Integrated Framework.” The Journal of Futures Markets 12 (1992): 705-28.

 

Electronic information systems and farmer decision making: Five case studies – 1992

In-depth interviews with four farmers and one grain purchaser currently using electronic information are used to explore the impact of electronic information systems on decision-making. Key findings are that the most successful users had articulated information needs, had an adequate store of human capital, used electronic information either to save time or to become more efficient with time, and had at least an informal overall management information system in their business. Thus, successful users found that use of electronic information system improved decision-making.

Streeter, Deborah H. “Electronic information systems and farmer decision making: Five case studies.” European Review of Agricultural Economics 19 (1992): 97-113.

 

Information Technology, Coordination, and Competitiveness in the Good and Agribusiness Sector – 12-1991

As business managers search for strategies to improve the competitive position of their firms, information technology is playing an increasingly crucial role. While much fo the literature on compeitivess as examined how such technology supports the strategic goals of the firm by lowering costs, raising barriers to outside competitors, or facilitating the differentiation of products, relatively little attention has been devoted to the role technology plays in shaping the relationship between players in a production-marking spectrum.

Streeter, Deborah H., Steven T. Sonka, and Michael A. Hudson. “Information Technology, Coordination, and Competitiveness in the Good and Agribusiness Sector.” American Journal of Agricultural Economics (Dec. 1991): 1465-471.

 

Acceptance to The Journal of Futures Markets – 11-1991

Mark J. Powers writes to Dr. Deborah Streeter accepting her “Variability in Soybean Futures Prices: An Integrated Framework” paper into the December 1992 Issue of The Journal of Futures Markets.

Powers, Mark J. “Acceptance to The Journal of Futures Markets.” Letter to Dr. Deborah Streeter. 22 Nov. 1991. Chatam, NJ.

 

Information Partnerships in the Food and Agribusiness Sector: An Alternative Coordination Strategy – 09-1991

One of the most significant changes which has occurred in the food and agribusiness sector in recent years is the increased focus on consumer demands. Traditionally, the role of agribusiness has been defined simply in terms of the relationship of firms to the farm producer, either as input providers or as purchasers of farm output. Now the entire agribusiness sector can be viewed more accurately as a vertical production-marketing continuum, in which traditional 1ines of division are blurred and the ultimate consumer is the driving force.

Streeter, Deborah H., and Michael A. Hudson. “Information Partnerships in the Food and Agribusiness Sector: An Alternative Coordination Strategy.” Journal of Food Distribution Research (Sept. 1991): 37-43.

 

Concept Maps: A Tool for Teachers and Learners – 07-1991

Concept maps are a tool developed at Cornell University. designed for use as a metacognitive strategy. or a general strategy. that helps the student “learn how to learn.” The goal of this paper is to illustrate how concept mapping can be used to integrate multidisciplinary subject matter. assist the teacher in understanding the knowledge base of the student. reveal misconceptions or missing conceptual links. help resolve communications problems between the student and the professor. and encourage reflective thinking by all participants in the learning process. Three specific teaching situations are presented: 1) preparation of class materials. 2) communication with students in the classroom or the office. and 3) training of a teaching assistant. Examples of actual concept maps drawn by the author and her students are included.

Streeter, Deborah H. Concept Maps: A Tool for Teachers and Learners. Staff Paper 91-18. Cornell University, July 1991.

 

Farm Information Systems: Perspectives and Research Issue – 05-1991

Considerable capital and human resources are expended each year in building, supporting and using information systems in farm and nonfarm businesses. The perception that information systems are relatively expensive has let to a desire by managers to evaluation more accurately the worth of such systems.

“Farm Information Systems: Perspectives and Research Issues.” NC-191 Committee on Farm Information Systems Proceedings. The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. 13-15 May 1991.

 

Variability in Soybean Futures Prices: Economic and Econometric Issues – 02-1991

The variance of price changes for soybean futures contracts is analyzed using recent developments in econometric modeling. The econometric methodology starts with a comprehensive model and sues a systematic approach to simplify the specification. The empirical results suggest that both the characteristics of the flow of new information into the market and the structure of the market are important factors influencing changes in the variance. It is difficult to appraise the value of the econometric procedures, but the final results appear to be relatively more robust than if a tradition, ad hoc approach to modeling had been used.

Streeter, Deborah H., and William G. Tomek. Variability in Soybean Futures Prices: Economic and Econometric Issues. Working paper 91-4. Cornell University, February 1991.

 

Handbook for Technical Analysis of Commodity Futures Markets – 01-1991

There are two types of analysis which guide trading in futures and options markets fundamental analysis and technical analysis. While some pursuits use just one of these two approaches, more and more traders are combining fundamental and technical analysis for optimal decision making.

Preston, Laurence. Handbook for Technical Analysis of Commodity Futures Markets. Working Manuscript. Cornell University, January 1991.

 

Departmental Rankings by AJAE Publication Rates – 1991

National visibility of research programs is an important goal of most agricultural economics departments. The principle strategy for achieving national recognition of research is through publication in peer reviewed journals. Of those, the American Journal of Agricultural Economics is the primary national journal for the profession.

Streeter, Deborah H., and Harry M. Kaiser. Departmental Rankings by AJAE Publication Rates. Working Manuscript. Cornell University, 1991.

 

The Impact of Computer Information Systems on Dairy Farm Management Decisions – 1990

This study focuses on whether information systems improve farm management. Fifty New York dairy farms were selected based on their use of computerized information systems. Each computer user was matched with a non-computer-using farm. On-farm interviews and business summaries were analyzed. Information systems provided the ability to do sensitivity analysis on planning decisions. Their speed of processing and accuracy contributed to control functions. Farmers with information systems spent more time on management tasks, but were more likely to delegate routine decisions. Farmer perceptions were tbat tbe systems had produced benefits that were equal to or exceeded coats.

Jofre-Giraudo, Eduardo, Deborah H. Streeter, and William Lazarus. “The Impact of Computer Information Systems on Dairy Farm Management Decisions.” Agribusiness 6 (1990): 463-74.

 

Management Information Systems: Impact on Dairy Farm Profitability – 07-1990

Seven of 196 New York dairy farms used on-farm computers for accounting in 1984, rising to twenty-three in 1987. A regression of net farm income per cow on computer use, years computer experience and other variables showed income increasing the first year of computer use, dropping and rising again by year.

Lazarus, William F., Deborah Streeter, and Eduardo Jofre-Giraudo. “Management Information Systems: Impact on Dairy Farm Profitability.” North Central Journal of Agricultural Economics 12 (July 1990): 267-77.

 

Models of the Variability of Futures Prices: Specification and Evaluation – 05-1989

Price variability is a major source of uncertainty in agriculture but typical models of price behavior attempt to explain changes in the mean of prices, while assuming that the variance of prices around the mean is constant. Only recently have analysts come to understand that measures of volatility, such as the variance of price changes, shift over time in systematic ways. This paper is about the specification and evaluation of models designed to explain price volatility.

Models of the Variability of Futures Prices: Specification and Evaluation. Staff Paper 89-14. Cornell University, May 1989.

 

Farmland Preservation: The Role of Off-Farm Income – 1988

Qff: farm income is of increasing importance in U.S. agriculture. As a survival strategy, it can increase the staying power of farm businesses and therefore may affect farmland preservation and urban planning. The paper presents an economic model of off- -farm work by farm operators. The purpose is to identify key.factors that affect labor-allocation decisions by farmers. The study adapts the traditional economic model to include non-monetary benefits as a variable influencing multiple job-holding.

Streeter, Deborah H. “Farmland Preservation: The Role of Off-Farm Income.” Landscape and Urban Planning 16 (1988): 357-64.

 

Welfare comparisons of U.S. Dairy Policies with and without Mandatory Supply Control –11-1988

The existence of costly dairy surpluses has led some policy makers to argue in favor of mandatory supply controls as an alternative to existing dairy policy. A dynamic econometric model is used to simulate the changes in equilibrium prices, quantities, producer and consumer welfare, and government costs that would occur if mandatory controls were adopted. The results show that while such a change in policy would eliminate the costs associated with current price supports, the benefits accruing to producers would be achieved at the expense of consumers and processors.

Kaiser, Harry M., Deborah H. Streeter, and Donald J. Liu. “Welfare comparisons of U.S. Dairy Policies with and without Mandatory Supply Control.” American Journal of Agricultural Economics 70 (Nov. 1988): 848-58.

 

An Economic Evaluation of the Food Security Act of 1985: The Dairy Title – 1988

This article examines the impact of the Food Security Act of 1985 on the nation’s milk market. Market equilibrium variables for the duration of the Bill, 1986 through 1990, are simulated based on a previously estimated econometric model of the national dairy sector. Forecasts of cow numbers, production per cow, milk production, milk prices, commercial disappearance, and government removals and costs of the dairy price support program are presented and analyzed. The results provide quantitative evidence of the market impact of the Farm Bill, which should be useful to policy makers and industry leaders in shaping future dairy policies.

Kaiser, Harry M., Deborah H. Streeter, and Donald J. Liu. “An Economic Evaluation of the Food Security Act of 1985: The Dairy Title.” Journal of Dairy Science 71 (1988): 2799-2806.

 

Electronic Information Systems and Commodity Marketing: Five Case Studies – 10-1987

Although price uncertainly has long been a fact of life for farmers, recently two factors have heightened concerns about price risk. Souring of public sentiment toward far programs has left farmers with the prospect of less federal price support in the future.

Streeter, Deborah. Electronic Information Systems and Commodity Marketing: Five Case Studies. A.E. Research 87-28. Cornell University, Oct. 1987.

 

A Dynamic Analysis of the Food Security Act and the Harkin-Gephardt Bill: The Dairy Sector – 09-1987

The adoption of mandatory supply controls would be a significant departure from past and present dairy policy. While farmers obviously would be affected by such a shift in policy, processors of fluid milk and manufactured dairy products, as well as consumers of dairy products, would also be affected. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the changes in equilibrium prices, quantities, producer and consumer welfare, and government costs that would occur if existing dairy policy were replaced with mandatory supply control program.

Kaiser, Harry M., Deborah H. Streeter, and Donald J. Liu. A Dynamic Analysis of the Food Security Act and the Harkin-Gephardt Bill: The Dairy Sector. A.E. Research 87-22. Cornell University, Sept. 1987.

 

Electronic Information – The Public/Private Sector Interface – 03-1987

Information technology and its associated products have received increasing attention from both the private and public sectors. Compelled by the vast potential for technological advance and by the dramatic social change associated with the information revolution, entrepreneurs, bureaucrats and scholars alike have flocked to the field of information goods.

Streeter, Deborah H. Electronic Information – The Public/Private Sector Interface. Staff Paper 87-2. Cornell University, 1987.

 

Nonmonetary Considerations in Farm Operator Labor Allocations – 11-1986

During the past decade increasing numbers of farm families have augmented their farm revenues with income from an off-farm job. In 1984, off-farm wages and salaries made up 31% of average farm family income. Over 60% of agricultural producers in the US now derive some of their income from off-farm work, a significant shift toward dependence of farm families on employment opportunities off the farm.

Streeter, Deborah H., and William E. Saupe. Nonmonetary Considerations in Farm Operator Labor Allocations. A.E. Research 86-28. Cornell University, Nov. 1986.

 

Signing Up, Spreadsheet Style – 03-1986

Should you participate in the government’s 1986 farm program? For many feed grain producers, the answer is clearly yes. With the bleak outlook for market prices, they can’t afford to snub the guarantee of federal price supports.

Streeter, Deborah. “Signing Up, Spreadsheet Style.” Farm Futures Mar. 1986: 16J-20J.

 

Using Options for Profitable Marketing on Farm Commodities – 1986

Agricultural options offer a solution to the farmer’s dilemma. They are a tool you can use to get the maximum possible price while protecting against a price decline. In other words, options are a way for you to reduce the risk of seeing prices drop lower, without losing the opportunity of seeing prices turn higher.

Streeter, Deborah H., and The Staff of Top Farmers of America. Using Options for Profitable Marketing on Farm Commodities. Milwaukee, WI: AgriData Resources, Inc., 1986.

 

Market Outlook – 03-1985

This month’s Market Outlooks has articles from across the agricultural sector ranging from “How USDA’s Farm Bill Plan Could Change Your Market” to “Pricing Opportunities to Come at 70 Cents”.

Stewart, Scott, and Deborah Streeter. “Market Outlook.” Ed. Gary Badertscher. Farm Futures Mar. 1985: 19-27.

 

Save Money Buying Smart – 03-1985

If you’re buying feed or livestock, rethinking your market strategy may help you cut your costs. Consider: you can buy on the cash market, you can forward contact, trade futures contracts or the new agricultural options. A home computer can help you compare those alternatives.

Streeter, Deborah. “Save Money Buying Smart.” Farm Futures Mar. 1985: E2-E3.

 

Weighing Your Marketing Alternatives Can be Fast and Easy – 02-1985

Once you enter Farmfutures’ marketing formula on a blank computer spreadsheet, figuring your best pricing opportunities is a simple as filling in eight blanks and pushing a few buttons.

Streeter, Deborah. “Weighing Your Marketing Alternatives Can Be Fast and Easy.” Farm Futures Feb. 1985: D8-D16.

 

Market Outlook – 02-1985

In this Farm Futures edition, the Market Outlook focuses on topics such as “Double Price Peaks in Store for 1985” and “Demand Stimulated by Recent Price Declines”.

Stewart, Scott, and Deborah Streeter. “Market Outlook.” Ed. Gary Badertscher. Farm Futures Feb. 1985: 11-18.

 

Say Goodbye to the Killer Loss – 01-1985

The Golden Rule of money management for commodity traders has always been: Protect yourself against adverse price swings with “stop-loss” orders. But the advent of options on futures contracts may change that.

Streeter, Deborah. “Say Goodbye to the Killer Loss.” Farm Futures Jan. 1985: C8.

 

Market Outlook – 01-1985

The January 1985 Market Outlook tells readers to “Look for $3 Prices by Spring” and that the “Best 1985 Prices (are) Due Before Summer”.

Stewart, Scott, and Deborah Streeter. “Market Outlook.” Ed. Gary Badertscher. Farm Futures Jan. 1985: 11-18.

 

Market Outlook – 09-1984

“World Crop Shortages: Their Loss May Be Your Gain” and “Stored Pork Bellies Hurting Chances for Rallies” are some focuses in this edition of the Farm Futures Market Outlook.

Stewart, Scott, and Deborah Streeter. “Market Outlook.” Ed. Gary Badertscher. Farm Futures Sept. 1984: 11-19.

 

Lang Buying Spreadsheet: What to Bid – 08-1984

Maybe like the Colwells, you have been eyeing a few neighboring acres now that prices seem to have hit rock bottom. How can you avoid the trap of paying too much for land? How can you figure out a bid price that meets your cash flow needs but also builds in longer-run considerations?

Streeter, Deborah. “Land Buying Spreadsheet: What to Bid.” Farm Futures Aug. 1984: 24-25.

 

Market Outlook – 08-1984

This months market outlook has an array of articles titled “Soviet Buying Spree: Will It Continue?”. “Weather Still the Key to Higher Prices”, “Limited Expansion Good for 1985 Prices”, “Summer Price Break Lifely Before Fall Uptrend” and “Steady Prices Likely Until Harvest”

Stewart, Scott, and Deborah Streeter. “Market Outlook.” Ed. Gary Badertscher. Farm Futures Aug. 1984: 11-18.

 

Market Outlook – 07-1984

This edition of the Market Outlook has articles on “Tracking July Weather: Key to 1984 Pricing” and “Set Prices on Weather Rallies”, among other things.

Stewart, Scott, and Deborah Streeter. “Market Outlook.” Ed. Gary Badertscher. Farm Futures July 1984: 11-18.

 

Strong Dollar, Weak Exports – 02-1984

The greatest immediate threat to US exports is the strength of the US dollar. The dollar is overvalued compared with other currencies, because US interest rates have been held high due to the large federal deficit.

Streeter, Deborah. “Strong Dollar, Weak Exports.” Farm Futures Feb. 1984: 34.

 

The Right Time to Borrow – 01-1984

Election years are supposed to bring speeches, platforms, slogans and lower interest rates. This year the tradition may be broken, as interest rates could stay high. Don’t get caught postponing your borrowing in hopes of cheaper credit in 1984. Right now could be your best opportunity to restructure or pay off loans originally taken out when rates hit 18-20%.

Streeter, Deborah. “The Right Time to Borrow.” Farm Futures Jan. 1984: S5.

 

Farm Futures Spreadsheet: 1984 PIK and RAP Profit Planner – 12-1983

Will the government programs pay off for you in 1984? You can use the accompanying worksheet to find out.

Streeter, Deborah. “Farm Futures Spreadsheet: 1984 PIK and RAP Profit Planner.” Farm Futures Dec. 1983: C8-C12.

 

Cattle Profit Planner – 07-1983

This year has had its share of surprises for livestock producers. But one area where you don’t need any more surprises is in your breakeven analysis. With more a volatile marketing environment these days, a flexible breakeven analysis becomes more vital for your farm business planning.

Streeter, Deborah. “Cattle Profit Planner.” Farm Futures July 1983: 18-19.

 

Pig Profit Planner – 05-1983

The March Hogs and Pigs report sent the experts back to their drawing boards to refigure price projections, while leaving producers pondering whether to continue expansion plans. To make the decision even more difficult, PIK sign-up results point to higher feed prices this year.

Streeter, Deborah. “Pig Profit Planner.” Farm Futures May 1983: 27-28.

 

Tracking Price Signals – 05-1983

While the daily price moves are the key figures you will be watching, there are other related reports that will add to your understanding of what is happening in the markets for the commodities that are important to your operation

Streeter, Deborah. “Tracking Price Signals.” Farm Futures May 1983: 30.

 

How to Survive the Recovery – 04-1983

The way economists have been revising their recovery forecasts lately, they seem like a school of minnows which abruptly turns in unison and swims in the opposite direction. Economists and policy makers are tripping over each other in the rush to be the first one on the block to identify the corner around which the recovery lies.

Streeter, Deborah. “How to Survive the Recovery.” Farm Futures Apr. 1983: 21.

 

Year of the Hog: Limited Rush Profit Strategy for ’83 – 02-1983

After some tough financial times, hog producers are back in the black again, Since limited supplies are responsible for the improved prices, you maybe wonder about our call for expanding production.

Streeter, Deborah. “Year of the Hog: Limited Rush Profit Strategy for ’83.” Farm Futures Feb. 1983: 34M-34P.

 

PIK Personal Planner – 02-1983

Using the accompanying worksheet, you can use your computer or a hand calculator to figure out whether or not the government programs make sense for you under a variety of price and yield assumptions.

Streeter, Deborah. “PIK Personal Planner.” Farm Futures Feb. 1983: 22H.

 

How Much Should You Pay for a Feeder Pig? – 10-1982

Cash hog prices hit all time highs in August, at the same time that corn prices began to plummet on the news of a record crop. At first glance, the high corn/hog ratio makes finishing out feeder pigs look like a lucrative proposition.

Streeter, Deborah. “How Much Should You Pay for a Feeder Pig?” Farm Futures Oct. 1982: 27.

 

Common Barriers to the Integration of Small Farms in Agricultural Development Policies –08-1982

Failure to consider the needs of families on small farms during the formulation of agricultural development policies may result in unexpected inequities that worsen the small farmer’s disadvantaged circumstances. An important challenge facing policy markets I the identification and implementation of strategies that will increase agricultural production and trade without disenfranchising or elimination small-scale farmers, especially when agricultural producers are on both extremes of the spectrum.

Saupe, William E., Deborah H. Streeter, and Atos F. Grawunder. Common Barriers to the Integration of Small Farms in Agricultural Development Policies in Brazil, Portugal, and the USA. Vol. 207. International Association of Agricultural Economists in Jakarta, Indonesia, Aug. 1982.

 

Journal of the Hiram Smith Institute (2) – 09-1981

In this edition of the Journal of the Hiram Smith Institute, students from UW-Madison have written about the roots of Ag. Economics, project profiles, Clemson Reports and up coming events.

Streeter, Deborah. Journal of the Hiram Smith Institute. University of Wisconsin Madison – Agricultural Economics Dept. (Sept. 1981): 1-14.

 

Journal of the Hiram Smith Institute (1) – 01-1981

The Journal of the Hiram Smith Institute is a comprehensible report produced by agriculture students at the University of Wisconsin.

Nunn, Chris, Kevin Mindock, and Deborah Streeter. Journal of the Hiram Smith Institute University of Wisconsin Madison – Agricultural Economics Dept. (28 Jan. 1981): 1-9.

 

Changes in Farm Poverty in Wisconsin – 05-1980

The report deals with the incidence of poverty in Wisconsin’s small-farm sector, with the circumstances and characteristics of low income farm families, and with recent changes in the situation.

Saupe, William E., William R. Garland, and Deborah Streeter. Changes in Farm Poverty in Wisconsin. University of Wisconsin-Extension R2052, 1980.

 

Changes in Farm Poverty in Wisconsin – 11-1979

The report deals with the incidence of poverty in Wisconsin’s small-farm sector, with the circumstances and characteristics of low income farm families, and with recent changes in the situation.

Saupe, William E., William R. Garland, and Deborah Streeter. “Changes in Farm Poverty in Wisconsin.” Institute for Research on Poverty at University of Wisconsin Madison (Nov. 1979): 1-25.

 

Caribbean Spiny Lobster Fisheries Surveyed – 07-1976

Caribbean Spiny Lobsters are the only species commercially viable to the United States. This species is only in the western central Atlantic, the Caribbean, and in the Gulf of Mexico. This article talks about the exporting and importing this important commodity.

Streeter, Deborah H., and Dennis M. Weidner. Caribbean Spiny Lobster Fisheries Surveyed. Marine Fisheries Review, July 1976.